10 Reasons to Catch Tudorcon 2020!

In 2020 Tudorcon goes online…

The in-person Tudorcon had to be postponed until next year. Instead of having nothing to do the first weekend of October, join your Tudor friends & fam online for a the first virtual Tudorcon!

Here are the ten reasons you should get onboard with Tudorcon 2020!…

10. Two days of live chats & lectures from leading historians, authors, and bloggers

9. A welcome evening online party with entertainment from Renaissance Faire performers & musicians from around the country

8. Recordings of the lectures so you watch live or catch them at your leisure

7. An exclusive online community with contests

6. Giveaways throughout the weekend

5. Tudor themed entertainment

4. A cooking demo

3. Virtual goody bag

2. More fun than another Zoom call for work

And the top reason is…the price for the entire weekend? Just $29.

Get your ticket here

Join the All Things Tudor FB group today for more fun & informative Tudor history!

Special Reveal! British History: Royals, Rebels and Romantics

British History: Royals, Rebels and Romantics with Carol Ann Lloyd

Tudor History and Shakespearean expert, Carol Ann Lloyd has announce a new weekly podcast, British History: Royals, Rebels, and Romantics. It is available on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, or wherever you find your podcasts.

Meet famous and infamous characters, walk with playwrights and peasants, and wander through castles and cathedrals. New episodes every Wednesday.

Have a question about British history, something you’ve always wanted to know? Just ask! Let’s explore history together.

Look for a free Zoom meeting on June 16th with Carol Ann. Send your questions to me at Deb@AllThingsTudor.com. I’ll forward them to Carol Ann, who so looks forward to these! Get this fun & informative event on your calendar today!

Join Zoom Meeting HERE
Meeting ID: 783 6748 4842
Password: 0jtV40

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Find the podcast at these sites:

Website

About Carol Ann Lloyd

Carol Ann Lloyd (or Lloyd-Stanger) is a speaker and writer who shares the stories of history and Shakespeare to illuminate what’s possible in our lives today. She presents in-person and online programs across the country for the Smithsonian, Royal Oak Foundation, Folger Shakespeare Library, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute/George Mason University, Agecroft Hall, and more. Carol Ann presented a TEDx talk about Shakespeare in October 2017. She also offers programs for business audiences that demonstrate how Shakespeare and history offer practical strategies to increase skills in leadership, public speaking, customer service, and interpersonal communication. Carol Ann earned Master of Education degree from the University of Virginia and a Master of Arts in Literature from the University of Utah. The former Manager of Visitor Education at the Folger Shakespeare Library, she is also an Instructor for Language at Work. She is a member of the National Speakers Association.

Look for her as a featured speaker in October at Tudorcon 2020!

Follow her at these social media sites!

Twitter

Instagram

Facebook

The Age of Plunder

Book Review by Samantha Yorke

Henry VIII is one of the most famous monarchs to have ruled England.

Yet, what was life like for those that he ruled?

How were they impacted by the wars with France, his marital disasters and the religious Reformation that his chief ministers implemented?

The Age of Plunder does not dwell upon the lives of political and religious leaders such as Wolsey, Cromwell and Cranmer, but instead provides a vivid depiction of Tudor England from the perspective of those who tended the crops, sat at the looms and worked in the mines.

“The scholarship is as sound, the sympathy as warm and the judgments as pugnacious as ever.” New Statesman

“This is a provocative and stimulating book, packed with statistical information, but saved from indigestibility by well-chosen and unusual examples drawn from the author’s vast knowledge of local history.” The Agricultural History Review

In this book W. G. Hoskins reveals how inhabitants of early sixteenth century England were witnesses to the greatest act of plunder since the Norman Conquest, but this time by the native governing class.

The Age of Plunder by W.G. Hoskins is a look at the economic state of the Henrican world of Tudor England. Unlike most books written about this monarch, it focuses on the lives the people in his kingdom. The stories of how Henry’s decisions effected his realm will catch your attention. The divide between privilege and poverty was obscene. The book is somewhat long, dry and academic and is aimed for a scholarly reader. If you are looking for a book about his wives and his court, this is not for you. However, if you want a book centered upon day-to-day life in the world of Henry VIII, and how his economy set the stage for his daughter Elizabeth I, eventually Great Britain and the ascent of the British Empire – the sociology of the era – then this book is for you. It is a book that can be utilised for reference and scholastic purposes, and for that reasons I rate it four stars.

~~~~~

Special thanks to Net Galley and the publish for giving me a copy of this book in exchange for a fair review.

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Available for purchase on Amazon:

US

UK

ANNOUNCEMENT: Field of Cloth of Gold Summit

During a blustery 18 days in June 1520, an historic event took place in the Pale of Calais. Here King Henry VIII of England and King Francis I of France met in an ostentatious display of power, wealth and status. Masterminded by Thomas Wolsey, the aim was to join the two kingdoms in a pact of solidarity and friendship, notably against the insurgence of the Ottoman Empire, which was threatening Christian Europe at the time.

It was a spectacular event that became famous in its own lifetime. Now 500 years on, over the weekend of the 9-10 May 2020, The Tudor Travel Guide is celebrating this historic event by holding a FREE two-day virtual summit. You will hear from experts in their fields talking about a range of different aspects of the event: from the social, political and cultural context, to original research to locate Henry’s celebrated temporary palace, clothing & textiles, food and more…

Speaker line up:

Saturday 9 May:  

Many of the speakers have offered to give away a copy of one of their books as part of a book bundle giveaway to one lucky winner, who will be selected at random at the end of the event. The winner will be notified by email and The Tudor Travel Guide will post the winner’s name on FB and Twitter. Books included in the bundle are:

  1. The Field of Cloth of Gold, by Glenn Richardson
  2. In the Footsteps of the Six Wives of Henry VIII, by Sarah Morris and Natalie Grueninger.
  3. Henry VIII and the Men who made Him, by Tracy Borman
  4. A Banquet at the Old Hall: An Invitation to participate in Historic Cooking, by Brigitte Webster
  5. Tudor London, by Natalie Grueninger
  6. The Great Wardrobe Accounts of Henry VII and Henry VIII, by Maria Heyward (tbc)
  7. A colour paper by Julian Munby of his original research on finding he location of the temporary palace at the Field of Cloth of Gold will also be included.

Yale University Press have also kindly offered to make free sample chapters available from a range of their Tudor related books (details still to be finalised) for EVERY registrant to the summit.

How to sign up:

This online summit is FREE attend. You simply need to register you name and email address. Don’t worry if you can’t make the dates and times advertised or are in a different time zone. All the videos will remain available to view until the 24 June 2020 to coincide with the final day of the actual event, 500 years ago. However only those registering for the event will have access to the videos.

How to register:

Sign up will open on Thursday 9 April 2020 and will remain open until 48 hours before the event, i.e. Midnight on Wednesday 7 May 2020.

Follow this link to the sign-up page & join today! REGISTER

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All images either Public Domain or shared courtesy of Dr Sarah Morris

Sir Francis Bryan

Sir Francis Bryan was Henry VIII’s most notorious ambassador and one of his closest companions. Bryan was a man of many talents; jouster, poet, rake and hell-raiser, gambler, soldier, sailor and diplomat. He served his king throughout his life and unlike many of the other men who served Henry VIII, Bryan kept his head and outlived his sovereign. This book tells the story of his life from coming to court at a young age through all his diplomatic duties to his final years in Ireland. 

Purchase here:

Amazon US

Amazon UK

Bio: Sarah-Beth Watkins’ life-long love of history and writing has seen her publish articles in magazines and online, and she is fast establishing herself as one of the world’s most eminent figures in the field of Tudor and Stuart biographical expertise with books such as Lady Katherine Knolly and The Tudor Brandons. Sarah-Beth also tutors creative writing and journalism. 

You can follow her at least sites:

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

The Ultimate Tudor Christmas Package

Gorgeous!

From author Natalie Grueninger and illustrator Kathryn Holeman…

We are thrilled to announce the perfect, complete gift package for the Tudor queen or king in your life. Fans of Tudor history know well that gift-giving is a dangerous business, and this package allows you to curate your selections to ensure peace and joy in your realm on Christmas morning.

The Ultimate Tudor Christmas Package includes:

  • 1 limited edition ornament. 3” x 3” frame with ribbon for hanging. Choose from 3 options: Elizabeth I, Anne Boleyn, or Elizabeth Woodville.
  • 1 copy of Colouring History: Tudor Queens and Consorts.
  • 1 box of 12 color pencils.
  • 1 bookmark. Pick from 2 options: Anne Boleyn or Elizabeth I.
  • 1 necklace. Pick from 3 options: Anne Boleyn, Elizabeth I, or Katherine of Aragon.
  • 1 notepad. Pick from 2 options: Tudor Floral or Tudor Florals & Creatures.
  • 1 coaster set. Pick from 2 options: 15th c. Tudor pattern or The Tudors.
  • 1 notecard. Pick from 3 options: Henry VIII and his 6 wives (humor), 15th c. Tudor pattern, and Winter’s Evening at Hampton Court Palace. This card will be placed on the outside of your wrapped package so you can write your own message to the recipient. NOTE: If you want us to write your note for you, there is a spot on the form at check-out for you leave us instructions to do so.
  • A beautifully gift-wrapped box including all items.

The limited edition package includes $100 worth of Tudor treasures for only $59.99 USD. It is gift wrapped with care using our illustrated Tudor pattern paper and ships for free within the United States. We also offer low international flat rate shipping.

The last day to order this package for Christmas Day is December 19, 2019.

All wrapped & ready to ship!

Shop now!

Colouring Tudor History

Ciphers, Secrets, and Spies in the Elizabethan Age

English history comes to Atlanta!

Join the Royal Oak Foundation as we explore the dark corners of Elizabethan history with Carol Ann Lloyd, who will reveal the spy network tasked with keeping Queen Elizabeth I safe.

William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley,
after Marcus Geeraerts, the younger.
©National Trust Images

The Elizabethan era (1558-1603) is often depicted as the “Golden Age” in England’s history—an era of great exploration and military victories in which Queen Elizabeth I is represented in sumptuous clothing and jewels. But the reality, which included religious conflicts that tore families apart; political challenges to Elizabeth’s authority; high levels of poverty and crime; and vulnerability to foreign invasion, was far grimmer.

Numerous plots were hatched to dethrone Elizabeth I and replace her with the Catholic Mary Queen of Scots. William Cecil (later Lord Burghley) was the first to oversee the gathering of intelligence and was aided by Francis Walsingham, another of Elizabeth’s most loyal ministers known as the Spymaster. Walsingham’s network of clandestine agents moved throughout England and Europe using their contacts and skills in navigating court politics to safeguard their Queen.

Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley and Mary, Queen of Scots by British National Trust Images

National Trust houses that were involved in this period of intrigue Baddesley Clinton and Coughton Court in Warwickshire, Oxburgh Hall in Norfolk, and Scotney Castle in Kent. Carol Ann will describe this tumultuous time with its secret plots, intercepted and decoded messages, and assassination attempts and reveal how the ability to control information became the most potent tool of the realm.

Queen Elizabeth I, by English School. ©National Trust Images

Event is Monday, November 25

6:30 p.m. lecture followed by a reception

Tickets:

$35 members & co-sponsors; $45 non-members

Location: Atlanta Decorative Arts Center,

351 Peachtree Hills Avenue, NE

To Register: www.royal-oak.org/events or call Kayla Smith at 212-480-2889, ext. 201. Use code TUDOR 19 to receive a discounted price.

Carol Ann Lloyd

Carol Ann Lloyd is a popular speaker who shares the stories of Shakespeare and English history. She is the former Manager of Visitor Education at Folger Shakespeare Library, where she gave workshops and tours about Shakespeare and Early Modern England. Carol Ann has presented programs at the Smithsonian, Folger Shakespeare Library, Agecroft Hall, and TEDx, among other venues. Ms. Lloyd is a member of the National Speakers Association.

Thank you to our co-sponsors: ADAC; Spalding Nix Fine Arts; Culture Club; Holland MacRae; The English-Speaking Union, Atlanta Branch; Oxford University Society of Atlanta

Thank you to co-sponsors: ADAC; Spalding Nix Fine Arts; Culture Club; Holland MacRae; The English-Speaking Union, Atlanta Branch; Oxford University Society of Atlanta Additional support for Atlanta lectures is generously provided by Ms. Lynne R. Pickens

The House of Grey

The Grey family was one of medieval England’s most important dynasties, serving the kings of England as sheriffs, barons and military leaders. Like many families, they were split by the Wars of the Roses, one man betraying Henry VI at the Battle of Northampton, whilst his cousin, Sir John Grey, died for Lancaster at the second battle of St Albans, leaving a widow, Elizabeth née Woodville, and two young sons, Thomas and Richard. Astonishingly, the widowed Elizabeth caught the eye of Edward IV and was catapulted to the throne as his wife. This gave her sons an important role after Edward s death. The Greys were considered rapacious, even by the standards of the time and the competing power grabs of the Greys with Richard, Duke of Gloucester led to Richard Greys summary execution when Gloucester became king. His brother, Thomas, vowed revenge and joined Henry Tudor in exile.

When Thomas Grey’s niece, Elizabeth of York, became queen, the family returned to court.  Thomas married the greatest heiress in England, Cecily Bonville, their numerous children gained positions in the court of their cousin, Henry VIII, and his children Mary, and the Duke of Richmond. Mary. The 2nd Marquis was probably taught by Cardinal Wolsey but was a vigorous supporter of Henry VIII’s divorce from Katharine of Aragon.  his son’s reckless involvement in Wyatt s rebellion ended in his own execution and that of his daughter, Lady Jane Grey, the ‘Nine Days Queen’. Weaving the lives of these men and women from a single family, often different allegiances, into a single narrative, provides a vivid picture of the English mediaeval and Tudor court, reflecting how the personal was always political, as individual relationships and rivalries for land, power and money drove national events.

Author Bio

Melita Thomas is the co-founder and editor of Tudor Times, a repository of information about Tudors and Stewarts in the period 1485-1625 

www.tudortimes.co.uk

Melita has loved history since being mesmerised by the BBC productions of ‘The Six Wives of Henry VIII’ and ‘Elizabeth R’, when she was a little girl. After that, she read everything she could get her hands on about this most fascinating of dynasties. Captivated by the story of the Lady Mary galloping to Framingham to set up her standard and fight for her rights, Melita began her first book about the queen when she was 9. The manuscript is probably still in the attic!

Whilst still pursuing a career in business, Melita took a course on writing biography, which led her and her business partner to the idea for Tudor Times, and gave her the inspiration for writing ‘The King’s Pearl: Henry VIII and his daughter Mary’.  The research for this book led her to want to know more about the Tudors’ cousins, the Greys, who were prominent members of the court. The result was the House of Grey.

Currently, Melita is studying for a Master’s in Historical Research at the University of London, and beginning research for her third book.  

In her spare time, Melita enjoys long distance walking. She is attempting to walk around the whole coast of Britain, and you can follow her progress here: https://mgctblog.com/

Melita Thomas

Buy the book here:

https://amzn.to/2JM4WI8

Marie de Guise

by Amy Blakeway


For over half the sixteenth century Scotland was ruled by children. In an age when the monarch’s will was the axis upon which political life turned and his or her authority was the source of all justice, periods without an adult ruler, known as royal minorities, were dangerous times indeed. Of course, six-day olds or four year olds did not actually control the country, but the question of who should rule on their behalf was a fraught one – and the person who answered it rarely satisfied everyone. Contemporaries said that Regents ‘bore the person of the monarch’ – that is, they were the monarch for the time. This total control over royal power made their rule potentially dangerous.

Because of a preference for appointing the adult heir to the throne as regent, usually, regents were men: six out of eight in the sixteenth century. However, female regents could be appointed in their husband’s will, or if a monarch was living abroad and needed to delegate their power during their absence. This is what happened in 1554: Mary, Queen of Scots was living in France and, since she was betrothed to the French heir to the throne, would be for the foreseeable future. Claiming that (aged just over eleven) she was now an adult, Mary ordered that James Hamilton, earl of Arran should give up the regency to her mother, Marie de Guise. Since the scheme was really masterminded by the powerful Henri II of France, the Scots had little choice but to agree.

Marie de Guise followed in the footsteps of other Stewart wives and mothers in the previous century, such as Joan Beaufort, mother of James II, and Mary of Gueldres, mother of James III. Between 1513 and 1514 Margaret Tudor, Henry VIII of England’s big sister and the widow of James IV, was regent for her son James V – she lost power when her remarriage meant she passed into the legal control of her new husband. But Marie de Guise was different: all these regents were only ever temporary rulers, who would give power when their child came of age. As Mary would remain in France with her husband, Marie de Guise was a new kind of regent, a permanent ruler on behalf of a perpetually absent monarch.

Despite widespread anxiety about women rulers, a dowager queen was a sound choice as regent for the simple reason that she loved her children. Shakespeare didn’t write Richard III in a vacuum and the fear that an ambitious uncle would take a leaf from Richard III’s book, kill his nephew and steal the crown, was frequently voiced. By contrast, it was assumed a mother would protect her children – and female regents manipulated that rhetoric to their own advantage, perhaps never more skilfully than Catherine de Medici, regent for her young son Charles IX of France.

However, Queen Mothers were not only defined by their gender. Their nationality posed problems for their candidacy as a regent. Catherine de Medici was Italian. Margaret Tudor was English, and Marie de Guise herself was French. Could a foreign-born woman really have Scotland’s interests at heart? For Marie de Guise, the mixture of gender and nationality combined with the extra-flammable ingredient of religious tension in a lethal cocktail which eventually caused her downfall.

Ironically, given that Marie would end her life as the hated face of French power in Scotland, in France she would have been regarded as slightly foreign. Her father, Claude, Duke of Guise, was one of the Princes Étrangers (stranger Princes) at the French court – this title denoted membership of an independent sovereign dynasty. They were descendants of the independent Dukes of Lorraine, whose lands would only be incorporated into France in the eighteenth century.

Marie arrived in Scotland in 1538 to marry James V – it was the second marriage for both of them. He had previously been married to Madeline, the sickly daughter of Francois I. Marie had in fact attended their marriage in Paris, accompanied by her first husband, Louis, duc de Longueville.

As Queen consort she brought considerable cultural capital to Scotland, corresponding with relatives in France to arrange for craftsmen to come over and remodel the royal palaces, and securing technical know-how for the Scottish mining projects. References to her ‘chariot’ suggest she may have been the owner of the first, or at least one of the first, carriages in Scotland. She also fulfilled her main job as Queen consort: to get pregnant and produce, preferably male, children, although sadly two boys she had in 1540 and 1541 lived only a short time.

In other words, Marie de Guise was a model Queen consort, but there is no evidence to suggest that she sought political influence. After James V died in 1542 no-one suggested that his widow should become regent: Marie de Guise’s job was to bring up the new Queen.

This poses an interesting question: how did Guise move from an apparently apolitical royal spouse in 1542 to becoming regent and ruling Scotland?

The process had begun by 1544 when she and a group of the nobility dissatisfied with the regent Arran, proposed a scheme that she should share power with him. Unsurprisingly, he rejected this and for a few months Marie de Guise tried to head up an alternative government. However, this failed – even the English, with whom the Scots were at war, were reluctant to negotiate with her. She and Arran made it up by the autumn and seem to have managed a working relationship of sorts until she took power in 1554.

Even when Guise was part of Arran’s regime, the fact she controlled a third of the crown lands posed problems for the regent. Crown revenues were reduced, and a rival source of patronage had the potential to eat away at his support. However, she enjoyed the trust of the King of France and in fighting the ongoing war against the English French support was crucial. This increased after 1548 when the Treaty of Haddington between France and Scotland promised French support for the war effort and arranged for Mary’s marriage to the Dauphin, Francois. This treaty meant that Mary would be absent from Scotland on a permanent basis and so created the circumstances which eventually developed into Guise becoming regent.

Many historians identify Marie de Guise’s visit to France from August 1550 until November 1551 as another key moment in her gradual ascent to the regency. Accompanied by many Scottish nobles, Guise certainly played a central role in French court life during this period and negotiated continued French support for Scotland. What is less clear, however, is whether these negotiations included discussion of the possibility that she herself would become regent, and, if so, whether Guise herself arrived in France ready to discuss this, or whether it emerged during the conversations.

Once she arrived back in Scotland, however, it was only the rapidly changing international situation in late 1553 which made the possibility of Guise becoming regent a reality. Mary Tudor’s accession to the throne of England meant the strengthening of France’s great rivals, the Hapsburgs, Mary Tudor’s maternal relations and the family from whom she sought a husband. Scotland needed to be bound more securely to France and following months of intense negotiations Arran agreed to resign the regency.

Mary’s enemies would later claim that she subverted the ceremony which appointed her regent by wearing the crown which belonged to her daughter – and that to make matters worse it was the French king’s representative who placed it on her head. Her arch-rival John Knox remarked that seeing Marie crowned in this way was ‘as seemly a sight (if men had eyes) as to place a saddle on the back of an unruly cow’. But, there is no corroborative evidence for this story and the only authors who mention it were not in Edinburgh when Guise became regent. It’s far more likely that this was either a fabrication or a wilful manipulation of the fact that the crown was moved from in front of Arran to Guise to symbolise the transfer of power. This story was designed to signal Guise’s dangerous ambition and so that she was dangerously unsuitable to rule.

Nevertheless, for the six years of her regency, she took her duties as regent seriously. For example, she held numerous justice ayres – peripatetic justice courts which moved around Scotland – this was particularly significant because dispensing justice was understood to be one of the key aspects of being a good ruler.

Even so, by 1555 the reality of an absentee Queen and a French regent who appointed French advisers to key posts was beginning to bite home. Parliament passed an act complaining that many Scots had been ‘speiking aganis the quenis grace [Marie de Guise] and sawing evill brute anent [spreading evil rumours about] the Maist Christin King of Frances subjectis send in this realme for the commoun weill’ and laying down heavy penalties for those who opposed it. In October 1557 the nobility refused Guise’s orders to invade England – they claimed that this was not in the best interests of Scotland, but only an attempt to please the French. John Knox reported that Guise was furious, but other evidence shows she and the nobility did manage to rebuild relations and remained on friendly terms for another year. When they did desert her, and explained to the public in Scotland and potential allies abroad why they were resisting their lawfully appointed regent, the nobles cited their religious concerns but, more importantly, their fear of French rule overturning Scottish laws and an eventual French conquest of Scotland.
Was there any truth in this? Marie always denied it. However, she had appointed trusted French officials to major roles in Scotland. She also at times viewed Scotland as a country which needed to be changed, and once wrote to her brother ‘God knows…what a life I lead. It is no small matter to bring a young nation to a state of perfection’.

From September 1558 onwards the growing Protestant party in Scotland became increasingly vocal. But it was only in May 1559 when this spilled over into violent rebellion against the regent – and even after this, it took many months of temporary compromise for key nobles to desert Guise. John Knox’s History of the Reformation in Scotland is one of the most important sources we have for this period. However, the fact he was absent from Scotland for much of Guise’s regency, combined with his obvious self-interest in the events he discussed, also makes it one of the most problematic. His attitude to Marie de Guise can only be described as venomous. For instance, he claimed that Marie de Guise persuaded the reformers to agree to Mary’s marriage to the Dauphin. Once they had agreed, she ‘began to spew furthe and disclose the latent venom of her dowble harte’. When the Archbishop of St Andrews executed the reformer Walter Milne, Knox said that Guise ‘as a woman born to dissemble and deceave’ was so persuasive in claiming that she had no foreknowledge of the execution that the Protestants, ‘suspecting nothing that the Queen consented to the foirnamed murder’ continued to seek out her support.

Knox’s need to justify the rebellion which he encouraged against Marie de Guise lead him to portray her as a dangerous villain, a French, Catholic, Woman, driven by ambition, which led her to bribe, deceive and corrupt those she encountered. It’s impossible to know which of these concerns prompted her subjects to rise against her in rebellion, but, it’s clear that by 1559 the exercise of power had transformed this once conforming Queen consort into a very dangerous woman indeed.

Amy Blakeway is a lecturer in History at the University of Kent. She is interested in the power and politics of sixteenth-century Scotland and the author of ‘Regency in Sixteenth-Century Scotland’. She currently lives in Canterbury but comes to Edinburgh whenever she can.

Article courtesy of the Dangerous Women Project, University of Edinburgh. Please contact Dr Ben Fletcher-Watson with any questions.

Support the Dangerous Women Project!

Original listing here

Feature image: Attributed to Corneille de Lyon (1500/1510–1575) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons